Education Matters

Education is one of the most powerful tools for fighting poverty and inequality, as well as laying the foundations for solid economic growth. The more we understand the world we live in and the more information we get about other cultures and histories, the greater our chances of understanding points of view that might differ from our own ones.

In the entire history of humanity, there have never been so many children in school as there are today. According to the World Bank (2016), the average length of schooling is expected to reach 10 years by 2050. In a century and a half, the figures for access to education in the world will have more than quintupled. Yet, 124 million children and adolescents are still out of school. In addition to these, there are more than 250 million children who have been to school, sometimes for several years, but who still cannot read.

Attending school helps us learn who we are, what we believe in and what role we play in the world. This sense of self is essential for personal growth. Furthermore, going to school not only has an impact on the future of children but on the future of their families, friends and communities. As more children are educated, the world becomes a brighter place. These photos, among 50, from all different corners of the world, have been voted among more than 19,513 submissions in the #Education2019 Photo Contest by Agora, a free-touse photography app that has been rewarding the world’s biggest prizes in global photo contests since 2017.

Harp learning by @gaukhar_yerk (Kazakhstan)

School in Tanzania by @lolafritz (Tanzania)

Learning to play the piano by @jan_cataneo (Italy)

Libraries Aren_t Dead by @jovanneamolat (Singapore)

My grandmother taught me to study at night by @nguyenvuphuoc (Vietnam)

Braille Educaton System by @jayakrishnan (Canada)

School students by @chandrani (India)

Teach by @phyomoe (Myanmar)

Feature image: Under the rain by @adeelchisht (Pakistan)

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