My Maldives

From tourist to expat, what life is like for a single British female in the Maldives

When people discover that I live in the Maldives, they always imagine that I am living on a beautiful tropical island, resplendent with coconut palms and white sandy beaches and that life is based around relaxing with a cocktail in hand. The reality of my Maldives lifestyle, however, is quite different to their imaginings but it is still one that I am grateful and privileged to have been given the opportunity to enjoy.

I discovered the Maldives almost 20 years ago, visiting as a scuba diver in search of mantas and whale sharks. My love and appreciation of the country, its people, its culture and traditions was almost immediate and resulted in me visiting the archipelago on over 30 occasions in the years following. In 2012 through a chance meeting over coffee, the opportunity to relocate arose, so I swapped my corporate life in the UK to living and working in one of the most dreamedabout places on Earth, promoting sustainable and local tourism.

Moving to the Maldives seemed the most natural thing in the world to me. I was fortunate that I had an established circle of local friends and an insight into day-to-day life, but I can imagine for others it may be a daunting prospect fused with excitement and intrepidation.

Certainly, living here regardless if it’s on a local island or in a resort, is very different to the experience of visiting as a tourist. For me, moving to the Maldives was always about experiencing the Maldives as a local, however, for those who want more, there is now a sizeable expat community living and working in the Maldives that provide a network for social events and gatherings.

As a single female in an Islamic society, many think that life must be difficult or challenging. To the contrary, with the exception of ensuring I dress modestly and respectfully, I have always felt I have lived my life as I would have done so back in the UK. I feel safe, at ease, welcomed, and respected. Living locally, you may see and hear things that you don’t necessarily agree with or are not in line with your own personal values and beliefs. My belief, however, is that no country is perfect. While it is my choice to make the Maldives my home, that does not automatically give me the right to criticize or express an opinion on how others should live their lives.

Working in the Maldives has meant adapting to a slower pace of business and I have learnt to accept that responses and action may come tomorrow or maybe next week! In fact, I probably create my own pressure and stress while everyone around me appears to have no care in the world. It has meant adapting to ‘on the way’ meaning ‘will be there within the hour’, that when it rains, everything comes to a standstill, and that locals don’t understand why I am not married and have no children!

My home has always been the island of Hulhumalé. Connected to both the airport and also to Malé by the Sinimale Bridge, Hulhumalé forms part of the capital area. Whilst it does have a beautiful long beach, it is not the idyllic image of the Maldives depicted on the internet and in travel brochures. It is what you would describe as suburban and still very much a developing city. It has been an interesting journey to watch how it has grown from a small community with only a handful of cafes and local shops to a bustling neighborhood.

Hulhumalé is certainly not short of local coffee shops, barista-style cafes, and a range of restaurants including a sushi bar, steakhouse, Moroccan, Indian, and Thai. There is a one-screen cinema, a sports track, gym and fitness facilities, banks, hospitals, local shops, convenience stores, and a supermarket. My daily routine is not really dissimilar to how it would have been in the UK, albeit a beer at the pub is now a coffee on the beach and I know not to guarantee to be able to find the same products/brand in my local convenience store from one week to the next!

Like everywhere I have lived, I tend not to always do the things that are on my doorstep. I dive much less than when I visited as a tourist but whenever I do find myself on the water, traveling by speedboat or ferry to visit and explore other islands, I do look out across the aquamarine water and reflect on how lucky I am to call this tropical paradise home.

Share this story, choose your platform!

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on tumblr
Share on google
Share on linkedin
Share on reddit
Share on vk
Share on email
About the author:

5 thoughts on “My Maldives”

  1. Very nice piece about living in the Maldives. Even as tourists we had similar feelings…hospitable and not terribly different from home.

    Reply
  2. Ruth
    Such interesting reading. So happy that your dream worked out.
    You are so lucky to live and work in such a beautiful place.
    Such a far cry from what you used to do. You are an inspiration to many.
    Love always
    Tansy

    Reply
  3. Hi Ruth, we would like to reproduce this in our magazine Mald Tourism Online. Is that possible. We’re always keen to know views on Maldives by non-Maldivians. Your desc of H/Male is interesting; I’ve never bn there, but hv a lot of family there

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Royal Heritage: Best Castles in Central Europe

Central Europe is mainly famous for its castles, vineyards, palaces, cathedrals, and beaches. The region also shows a variety of architectural pieces, culture, and influential designs of art. The world’s most beautiful palaces are built there which will give you umpteen opportunities to enjoy!  Now, the most important part is to enjoy the trip! nd

Read More »

Four Seasons Resort Hoi An and the Cult of Well-being

With the end of the pandemic coming into sight, travel in 2021 is going to be all about getting back to Nature, touchless tech, health and wellness, and smaller footprints and bigger hearts, all while maintaining a comfortable distance from fellow guests. If there ever was a property tailor-made for the pandemic world and beyond,

Read More »

Dressed to Impress in Hoi An

Hoi An is arguably Vietnam’s most photogenic town, with its artfully peeling ochre-colored walls, colorful silk lanterns, and centuries of history starting out as a bustling seaport on the Silk Maritime Route. As if that weren’t enough for epic photos, in summer 2020, friends Leo and Van opened up Viet Phuc, a costume rental shop

Read More »

5 great places to visit on New Zealand’s South Island

Arriving in New Zealand, one is immediately confronted with the country’s dedication to the conservation of nature. Permits may be required for a multitude of items, ranging from animals, plants, seeds to ginseng roots. Before starting your exploration of the pristine wilderness of the South Island, one needs to be aware of the strict DOC

Read More »
Quy Nhon Beach

Why Your Next Beach Getaway Should Be to Quy Nhon

If you’ve never heard of Quy Nhon (pronounced kwee nyohn), you’re not alone. Situated on Vietnam’s South-Central coast, sandwiched between the tourist meccas of Hoi An and Nha Trang, this pretty, laid-back city of about 500,000 doesn’t get a lot of press outside of Vietnamese-language media, and even then it’s mostly limited to striking drone

Read More »

MÖVENPICK RESORT WAVERLY PHU QUOC HONORED AS THE BEST “LUXURY FAMILY RESORT IN ASIA” OF THE WORLD LUXURY HOTEL AWARDS 2020

Regarded as one of the most splendid resorts in 2020, Movenpick Resort Waverly Phu Quoc made a mark with its astonishing achievements. Recently, the first international five-star resort on Ong Lang beach has set a new record as “the Best Luxury Family Resort in Asia” at the 2020 World Luxury Hotel Awards. Despite the hotel’s

Read More »