Pet of the Month

Augusta and Savannah are two special ARC kittens who are looking for their forever home(s). The pair had been abandoned at a construction site and were crying loudly enough to be found by a passerby. Luckily for the two kittens, that passerby was Traci, an ARC volunteer. Traci took them home and fostered them even though she had cats of her own. Augusta and Savannah are now a little over one year old and have been spayed. They currently are in the cat room in Thao Dien, where they can be found relaxing and hanging out with the other cats.

Since their rough start, the kittens have always been a bit skittish on first meetings with people, but then warm up and become very loving. Augusta, the little white and ginger girl, is typically the most laid back of the two. Savannah, a watchful ginger, is often found grooming and taking care of her sister. The two have always been together, and all of the volunteers would love to see them adopted together, but that isn’t a requirement.

The Benefits of Adopting in Pairs
If you work out of the home a lot, two cats do a good job babysitting one another. They can play, clean each other or, y’know, whatever cats do when humans aren’t around. Having two cats allows them to be cats when they are interacting amongst themselves. They mutually nurture and embrace their feline instincts.

Adopting two cats at once puts both of them on even playing fields. If you bring a kitten (or any cat, really) into the home of an older cat, there will definitely be a power imbalance. If you bring two adult cats home at the same time, it’s going to be more of a bonding experience for the both of them. Cats are curious and crave constant stimulation. A single cat may become bored and entertain itself by chewing on plants, climbing drapes and furniture, unrolling toilet paper, or exploring electrical cords and sockets. However, two cats will occupy each other by finding interesting shadows to chase and games to play until they finally tired and fall asleep, too.

Although cats are known to be fastidious self-groomers, having a second cat could help redouble their efforts. They are likely to groom each other and clean hard to reach places that are often neglected. If you find the right match, you can be rest assured that those spots behind the ears or on the neck are being addressed on the regular.

If you would like to meet Augusta and Savannah, please contact the ARC cat foster and adoption team at arccatfostadopt@gmail.com

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